Jennie Evenson

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Jennie Evenson is the author of "Shakespeare for Screenwriters" (Michael Wiese, 2013) and the forthcoming "Storytelling Secrets of the Masters." As a writer in LA, Evenson worked as a consultant for Netflix and developed ideas at production houses from DreamWorks to Focus Features. You can follow her on Twitter: @JM_Evenson

Posts by Jennie Evenson 16 results

What Shakespeare Tells Us About Remakes, Adaptations and Reboots

We usually think of Shakespeare as one of the most uniquely gifted writers of all time. But the truth is that very few of his stories are "original" in our sense of the word. In fact, only two of Shakespeare's thirty-eight plays have no known source. The rest were stolen -- that's right, stolen -- from specific, identifiable sources.

The 5 Types of “No” In Hollywood And What They Actually Mean

Let's face it: not everyone who reads your work is going to like it. Some songs make you want to get up and dance, and some don't. That's the nature of the beast. So let's go over a few of the common responses from Hollywood producers, agents and managers and think about what they mean for you and your work.

5 Script Contests Actually Worth Entering

Getting representation from an agent or manager in Hollywood is not easy. You have to find someone who believes in you and your work, and you need to believe that they are both capable and willing to sell your work. One of the better ways to get noticed is script contests. Here are the ones we think have the chops to get you into Hollywood.

What Do People Mean By ‘Voice,’ Anyway?

Even if you've been writing for a long time, there's always room to hone your voice and see if you can amp up your originality and style. So let's take a look at a few writers and directors -- by no means an exhaustive list -- and see what we can glean about voice from their uniquely resonant work.

6 Ways To Network Better and Smarter

Many writers despise networking. Networking can produce serious anxiety in those who worry that they'll come off as awkward. Just as importantly: many of us don't have time to do the networking necessary to advance our careers -- many of us have responsibilities both at home and at our day jobs -- and what little free time we have, we'd like to spend writing. But since networking is crucial for your career, let's think of a few ways to take your networking game up a notch.

5 (Somewhat Helpful) Ways To Beat Procrastination

Most of the rest of us struggle with procrastination at some point in our writing career. This article is for you. Since we all know putting things off is bad, let's think of some ways to get ourselves out of hole when the temptation to procrastinate (nearly) overpowers us.

The One Question Everyone In Hollywood Asks And How To Answer

Not many of us enjoy selling ourselves. It can be awkward and embarrassing. But since it's such an important part of the meeting structure here in Hollywood, let's think about some ways to pitch yourself.

5 Types Of Heroes Everyone Loves

Writers rarely stop to categorize the many different variations of characters out there. But categories can be useful if you are at the conception stage and unsure which way to go, or stuck in the middle of draft and wondering what your hero ought to do next. Let's look at five types of classic heroes.

5 Rewrite Strategies That Actually Work

We've all heard that "good writing is rewriting," and we all know that first drafts aren't meant to be perfect -- they're our so-called "vomit" drafts, and their purpose is to get the story OUT. But what happens after that? How do we go from a rough draft to a polished script?

Want To Create A Supervillian? Try This

Everyone knows a compelling hero is central to a good script. Writers spend hours thinking through our hero's back stories. We grace them with inspiring goals and bedevil them with fascinating flaws. But the real secret to a good hero is a good villain.

How To Make Your Climax Feel Inevitable (But Not Predictable)

If your story doesn't stick it on the landing, chances are audiences will leave feeling irritated and unsatisfied. So, how can we create endings that make the audience feel like the story couldn't have finished any other way? Here are five story tricks to give your climax that jigawatt jolt.

What Can We Learn From Classic Movies? Pretty Much Everything

Classic movies may not have a lot of explosions or crazy car chases, but they still keep audiences nailed to their seats. So: how do they do it? What makes their stories so romantic, funny, heartrending or frightening? Why have these movies stood the test of time...?
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